Climate Change, Environmental Hazards, Science

Humans Cause Global Warming Proven In New Study

An oil sands mine north of Fort McMurray, Canada shows the extensive damage done to the local environment in the ongoing search for fossil fuels.
An oil sands mine north of Fort McMurray, Canada shows the extensive damage done to the local environment in the ongoing search for fossil fuels. Photo: Elias Schewel | FlickrCC.

According to the Joint Research Centre, which serves as the European Commission’s in-house science service, a new study published in February confirms that human activity drives global warming.

For most of us, that doesn’t really seem necessary. We know that human activity causes global warming. We’re more interested in finding ways to slow it down or reverse it. But there are still people out there, even a handful in the scientific community, who don’t believe that humans cause global warming.

Belief is key to this problem, because this not believing in global warming is contrary to all evidence. And the people who don’t support human activity as the cause of global warming are generally either misinformed and flat out lied to by people who have a reason to argue against human causes.

Of course, convincing the people who want to keep releasing CO2 into the atmosphere to feed their wallets is going to take far more than scientific proof. They need a profit motive to change their minds.

But the people who simply don’t know better, well maybe yet another study will help change their minds. This most recent study looked at measurements taken for the last 150 years of temperatures, carbon dioxide emissions, and methane emissions. They found, not only that all of these things have been increasing due to human activity, but the regions worse affected were North America, China, Europe, Siberia, the Sahel zone of Africa, and Alaska.

The first three aren’t very surprising, as they’re centers of population and manufacturing. The others are going to take some additional research to figure out why those regions are so heavily affected, when there are far less emissions there.

The researchers are suggesting that we start doing research in that direction, to figure out why these less populated regions are so affected, and that’s a great idea. Getting people to understand this data, or care about it, might be the first step though.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s